Wildlife on the Edge

three chimneys on the edge of cliff at Geevor

The landscape and biodiversity in Cornwall today has been greatly altered by thousands of years of searching for and extracting metals and minerals.

The Geevor and Levant landscape is a mosaic of natural and man-made habitats with a long history of human use that has led to a colourful post-mining environment. Through the patchwork of fields and spoil heaps there is a wide range of flora and fauna unique to this coastal location. The sea spray and the naturally occurring heavy metals in the soil create an inimitable environment which is inhabited by a surprisingly varied selection of species that have adapted to live in these hostile conditions.

Photograph reproduced with the kind permission of the Geevor Archive, 360 panorama view reproduced with the kind permission of the University of Plymouth

 

At the Mercy of the Elements

Click to see a larger version of this imagebraken from the wildlife on the edge trail

Bracken is one of the first species to colonise neglected ground.


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Species Invaders

Click to see a larger version of this imageJapanese Knotweed

Non-native plant species are those that are not believed to be local to the area and often come from far-flung locations.


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Cave Dwellers

Click to see a larger version of this imageBat

The old mine buildings are home to Geevor's nocturnal animals.


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What is Biodiversity?

Click to see a larger version of this imagewealth of biodiveristy around the Geevor site

Biodiversity is short for 'biological diversity', which describes the variety of life we have on Earth.


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Comment left by aissa bensadoun on 2010-03-29 11:47:28

hello, thank you every body for this site , it's very intersting, i found what i was looking for thank once gain aissa from algeria

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